Why this ad?
Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
According to the BBC, infection rates of koalas in some regions of Australia have reached as high as 90%. But not all the news is bad - chlamydia is treatable with antibiotics while volunteers help rehabilitate the sick. With a vaccine nearing development, now is the time to act and bring the koala back from the brink of extinction.
Goal: 50,000 Progress: 45,071
Sponsored by: The Animal Rescue Site

Quite possibly one of the cutest animals in existence, the Australian koala is facing serious health dangers. An epidemic of chlamydia has begun to ravage Australia's koala population. In koalas, chlamydia is a nasty bacterial disease with symptoms including blindness, respiratory infections, and even infertility.

Combined with other threats from habitat loss and dog attacks, koalas now face the possibility of extinction. Though chlamydia doesn't directly kill the animals, rendering them infertile means koalas could become extinct in as little as a few decades.

About 40% of Australian female koalas are now infertile. We must intervene if we are to reverse the pattern that could lead these cuddly creatures to extinction.

Sign the petition asking Australia’s Federal Environment Minister to elevate koalas to endangered status and ensure they receive the resources necessary to avert this catastrophe.

Sign Here






Dear Hon. Mark Butler, PM:

I am writing to express my concern over the current koala situation in Australia. I've learned that chlamydia is taking a huge toll on the koala population and rendering them infertile. Though chlamydia causes a range of health problems for these adorable animals, infertility is the most ominous as it threatens to extinguish the entire koala population.

Though there are treatment options, once chlamydia enters a koala's urinary tract, the animal is most often rendered infertile. With a vaccine in development, now is the time to grant the animal greater federal protection under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), providing the species with a chance of recovery.

This national emblem deserves national protection, rather than patchwork solutions offered at state and local levels that provide inadequate coverage.

Thank you for your time.

Petition Signatures


Apr 20, 2015 Marie Perkins
Apr 20, 2015 Diane Gudatis
Apr 20, 2015 Al Lindstrom
Apr 20, 2015 Amy Wilkerson
Apr 20, 2015 (Name not displayed)
Apr 20, 2015 Judy Collins
Apr 20, 2015 Joan Ardrey
Apr 20, 2015 (Name not displayed)
Apr 20, 2015 Maryam Malmstrom
Apr 19, 2015 Karen Marino
Apr 19, 2015 Tina White
Apr 19, 2015 Carla Head
Apr 19, 2015 Carica Stein
Apr 19, 2015 Lise Witter
Apr 19, 2015 Marie pierre Boucherat
Apr 19, 2015 Jean Piemonte-Lehman
Apr 19, 2015 angelique manen
Apr 19, 2015 (Name not displayed)
Apr 18, 2015 kanella antonopoulos
Apr 18, 2015 Ana Andre
Apr 18, 2015 tina owens
Apr 18, 2015 Elizabeth Veiga
Apr 18, 2015 S Newport
Apr 17, 2015 Ellen Cather
Apr 17, 2015 Carol McDonald
Apr 17, 2015 Tina Markowe
Apr 17, 2015 Danielle Schultz
Apr 17, 2015 Joyce Moore
Apr 17, 2015 Rativa Jahan
Apr 17, 2015 Sherry Spurling
Apr 17, 2015 Tiffany Terry
Apr 17, 2015 Tammy Williams
Apr 17, 2015 Karen Hughes
Apr 17, 2015 Minerva Mollica
Apr 17, 2015 sas s
Apr 17, 2015 Danielle Halverson
Apr 17, 2015 Lauri Rogers
Apr 17, 2015 Marcee Bogan
Apr 17, 2015 Edward Skinner Please place the koalas on the endangered species list!
Apr 17, 2015 Laureen Vaurie
Apr 17, 2015 Johanna Kristin Sigurz
Apr 17, 2015 Sally Simpson
Apr 17, 2015 Clarissa Lucia
Apr 17, 2015 Detelina Guecheva
Apr 16, 2015 (Name not displayed)
Apr 16, 2015 Karin Schliegl
Apr 16, 2015 samantha meyers
Apr 16, 2015 Joan Campbell
Apr 16, 2015 debbie meadows
Apr 15, 2015 Sheyna Walters

back to top

Why this ad? Why this ad? Here Comes the Sun Short Sleeved Tee
Share this page and help fund food & care: