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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 14,621
Sponsored by: The Animal Rescue Site

Animal abuse is a far too prevalent of an issue in the United States. Almost 2,000 cases were reported last year [1], in only 15 states. While neglect and abandonment is the most common form of abuse, there are documented cases of animals being shot, beaten, stabbed, and tortured.

Despite the best efforts of animal advocates, clamping down on abuse is a fiercely uphill battle. Until 2017, animal abuse wasn't even a category in the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) [2]. Previously, it fell under the umbrella term: "All Other Offenses," [3] making it impossible to determine the full scale of animal abuse across those states that chose to participate with the NIBRS.

There's still a problem, however. Participation in the NIBRS is not mandatory. Currently, only 30 percent of the country is served by the NIBRS. This results in a piecemeal picture of who the nation's animal abusers are, what crimes they've committed, and where they live. Projections on the full numbers from such a small sample of NIBRS-participating states are terrifying, especially when considering many animal abuse incidents go unreported.

The FBI's inclusion of animal abuse as a separate category on the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) is a step in the right direction [3], but that is only a first step. Thirty percent of the nation accounted for in the NIBRS is simply too little to be effective.

Tracking animal abusers is also critical to the safety of humans. Often, violent people being their crimes targeting animals and later turn their whims to people. According to the Human Society of the United States, "A 2001-2004 study by the Chicago Police Department "revealed a startling propensity for offenders charged with crimes against animals to commit other violent offenses toward human victims." Of those arrested for animal crimes, 65% had been arrested for battery against another person [4]." The Humane Society also cites other studies finding 46% of murderers "admitted committing acts of animal torture as adolescents and seven school shooters between 1997 and 2001 "who had previously committed acts of animal cruelty." [4]

Join us in calling on the FBI to make reporting of abuse to the NIBRS mandatory, and to get 100% of the country reporting! Until we have complete information, countless animals remain at risk!

Sign Here






To the Director of the FBI

The FBI has started down a great path with the inclusion of animal abuse as a separate crime in your NIBRS reports. Animal abuse is often a precursor to violence against people, and by labeling animal abuse clearly could very well save lives.

The FBI's inclusion of animal abuse as a separate category on the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) is a step in the right direction [3], but that is only a first step. Thirty percent of the nation accounted for in the NIBRS is simply too little to be effective.

Tracking animal abusers is also critical to the safety of humans. Often, violent people being their crimes targeting animals and later turn their whims to people. Countless studies have linked the inclination for animal abuse with future violent crimes, which only reiterates the importance of clear, precise tracking for those who would harm animals.

By expanding the list to cover the entire United States, the FBI can help protect and defend animals and humans across the country.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Petition Signatures


Jan 17, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 17, 2018 Dawn Cline
Jan 17, 2018 Nancy Ferro We need this register to determine who has abused animals in the past and to call them out publically because of proven facts. Hiding this information is dangerous and can actually promote animal abuse because there is no watchdog to oversee it.
Jan 17, 2018 Annette Hanson
Jan 17, 2018 Diane Smith
Jan 17, 2018 Terri Watson
Jan 17, 2018 Cathy Houseknecht
Jan 16, 2018 Pat Smith
Jan 16, 2018 Shabnam Shafiq Please make reporting of abuse to the NIBRS mandatory, and to get 100% of the country reporting! Until we have complete information, countless animals remain at risk! Please end the suffering of countless animals. Thankyou.
Jan 16, 2018 Kris Maillet
Jan 16, 2018 Kate Newton
Jan 15, 2018 Gulden Comic
Jan 15, 2018 MICHELE Beger
Jan 15, 2018 Wendy Walrath
Jan 15, 2018 nicole clevenger
Jan 15, 2018 Beth Williamson
Jan 15, 2018 moreau agnès
Jan 15, 2018 Marsha Traylor
Jan 15, 2018 michele martin
Jan 15, 2018 Lisa Thoreson No animal abuser should be allowed to have another pet, any pet!!!
Jan 15, 2018 Angie Manton
Jan 15, 2018 Octavia Salerno
Jan 14, 2018 Sieglinda Preez
Jan 14, 2018 Diane Miller
Jan 14, 2018 Lexey Williams
Jan 14, 2018 janet williams
Jan 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 14, 2018 ann reilly
Jan 14, 2018 Nicole Stephens It's a fact - a real one, people. People who abuse animals, which in and of itself is HORRIFIC, are statistically much more likely to be a wife beater, husband abuser, child abuser, bully, etc. A national registry would be a helpful addition to laws.
Jan 14, 2018 alexis ciccone
Jan 14, 2018 Karen Brey People need to be held accountable for what they do! Try working on the other end when these animals are found. I work full-time in the investment industry and volunteer time and money to help animals who have been rescued. Have these a-holes pick up ..
Jan 14, 2018 (Name not displayed) Thank you for posting & sharing all these!
Jan 14, 2018 barbara brown
Jan 14, 2018 Annie Blanc
Jan 14, 2018 Kim Goodman
Jan 14, 2018 therese kiefer
Jan 14, 2018 Jambrina Sakellaropoulo
Jan 13, 2018 Cathy Saunders
Jan 13, 2018 Joan Maynard
Jan 13, 2018 Nancy Paskowitz
Jan 13, 2018 Susan Smith
Jan 13, 2018 christine Horowitz
Jan 13, 2018 Brenda Rule
Jan 13, 2018 Janet Yawn
Jan 13, 2018 Sheri Nolen
Jan 13, 2018 Mary Hatzigiannis
Jan 13, 2018 Deborah Ackles
Jan 13, 2018 Jamie Thomas
Jan 13, 2018 Jim Beasley
Jan 13, 2018 Gerianne Hayden

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