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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 25,895
Sponsored by: The Animal Rescue Site

Animal abuse is a far too prevalent of an issue in the United States. Almost 2,000 cases were reported last year [1], in only 15 states. While neglect and abandonment is the most common form of abuse, there are documented cases of animals being shot, beaten, stabbed, and tortured.

Despite the best efforts of animal advocates, clamping down on abuse is a fiercely uphill battle. Until 2017, animal abuse wasn't even a category in the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) [2]. Previously, it fell under the umbrella term: "All Other Offenses," [3] making it impossible to determine the full scale of animal abuse across those states that chose to participate with the NIBRS.

There's still a problem, however. Participation in the NIBRS is not mandatory. Currently, only 30 percent of the country is served by the NIBRS. This results in a piecemeal picture of who the nation's animal abusers are, what crimes they've committed, and where they live. Projections on the full numbers from such a small sample of NIBRS-participating states are terrifying, especially when considering many animal abuse incidents go unreported.

The FBI's inclusion of animal abuse as a separate category on the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) is a step in the right direction [3], but that is only a first step. Thirty percent of the nation accounted for in the NIBRS is simply too little to be effective.

Tracking animal abusers is also critical to the safety of humans. Often, violent people being their crimes targeting animals and later turn their whims to people. According to the Human Society of the United States, "A 2001-2004 study by the Chicago Police Department "revealed a startling propensity for offenders charged with crimes against animals to commit other violent offenses toward human victims." Of those arrested for animal crimes, 65% had been arrested for battery against another person [4]." The Humane Society also cites other studies finding 46% of murderers "admitted committing acts of animal torture as adolescents and seven school shooters between 1997 and 2001 "who had previously committed acts of animal cruelty." [4]

Join us in calling on the FBI to make reporting of abuse to the NIBRS mandatory, and to get 100% of the country reporting! Until we have complete information, countless animals remain at risk!

Sign Here






To the Director of the FBI

The FBI has started down a great path with the inclusion of animal abuse as a separate crime in your NIBRS reports. Animal abuse is often a precursor to violence against people, and by labeling animal abuse clearly could very well save lives.

The FBI's inclusion of animal abuse as a separate category on the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) is a step in the right direction [3], but that is only a first step. Thirty percent of the nation accounted for in the NIBRS is simply too little to be effective.

Tracking animal abusers is also critical to the safety of humans. Often, violent people being their crimes targeting animals and later turn their whims to people. Countless studies have linked the inclination for animal abuse with future violent crimes, which only reiterates the importance of clear, precise tracking for those who would harm animals.

By expanding the list to cover the entire United States, the FBI can help protect and defend animals and humans across the country.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Petition Signatures


Apr 25, 2018 Elizabeth Jacobson
Apr 25, 2018 Gary Daudet
Apr 24, 2018 Poppy S End this now. Leave these poor beautiful animals alone they have feelings too. Panish the absusers the worst possible way so they can suffer just how they suffered. Theses abusers are not human it's inhumane no space for them on this earth!!!
Apr 24, 2018 Patricia Dangle
Apr 24, 2018 Julia Stark
Apr 24, 2018 Kimberly Bruno
Apr 24, 2018 kristin smith
Apr 24, 2018 Courtney Sulak
Apr 24, 2018 Jennifer Brunson
Apr 24, 2018 Marcia Richardson
Apr 24, 2018 Paul Dunne
Apr 24, 2018 Teresa Welch
Apr 23, 2018 Carly Fowler
Apr 23, 2018 rey mora
Apr 23, 2018 Susan Mueller
Apr 23, 2018 Stella Alejos
Apr 23, 2018 Lynne Holt
Apr 23, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 23, 2018 Kristen Gilkeson
Apr 23, 2018 Vasudha Chandra
Apr 23, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 23, 2018 Michele Wolfer
Apr 23, 2018 Louise Odams
Apr 22, 2018 Adriana Miritescu
Apr 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 22, 2018 Esther Garinger
Apr 22, 2018 Katherine burt
Apr 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 22, 2018 evelyn boggess
Apr 22, 2018 Donna Alles
Apr 22, 2018 Gail Beard
Apr 22, 2018 Frank Puglis
Apr 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 22, 2018 Rita Willis
Apr 22, 2018 Bob Willis
Apr 22, 2018 Bob Hickford
Apr 22, 2018 Rose Hickford
Apr 22, 2018 Sylvia Mikulski
Apr 21, 2018 Shawn Kovacich
Apr 21, 2018 Patty Audrain
Apr 21, 2018 Elizabeth Harvey
Apr 21, 2018 Maria Bastos
Apr 21, 2018 Noreen Styacko
Apr 21, 2018 Suzanne Garvey
Apr 21, 2018 Cate Abicht
Apr 21, 2018 Fred Fall
Apr 21, 2018 Jennifer Ford
Apr 21, 2018 Melina Hioti
Apr 21, 2018 Adeline Chan
Apr 21, 2018 (Name not displayed)

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