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Goal: 35,000 Progress: 19,961
Sponsored by: The Animal Rescue Site

The graceful beauty and power of a husky barreling through snow shouldn't invoke feelings of suffering and torture. But every year since 1973, during Alaska's 1,000-mile Iditarod race in early March, hundreds are forced into a state-sanctioned nightmare.

The Iditarod has long been controversial for its treatment of sled dogs. They're whipped and driven to run more than 100 miles a day in sub-zero temperatures. And while the power to keep those dogs safe lies with the State of Alaska, exemptions are actually in place precluding the dogs from protection under animal cruelty laws.

Hardly an Iditarod has been held in which a dog did not die.

In almost all of the Iditarod races, at least one dog death has occurred. According to the Sled Dog Action Commission, at least 147 dogs have died in the history of the race, with 15 to 19 falling dead from overwork in the very first, 43 years ago. At least 107 dogs were dead after the 1997 race, as reported by the Anchorage Daily News at the time. In 2009, five dogs died, leaving local veterinarians and animal rights workers helpless to do anything but watch.

"Last year, three dogs died. That is near the average for the Iditarod, and the causes of two of the 2008 deaths were quickly obvious," the Alaska Dispatch News reported the gruesome state of the race in 2009. "One dog was struck and killed by a snowmachine. The other had at some point during the race spit up intestinal fluids and then inhaled them. It was dropped at a checkpoint along the trail and flown back to Anchorage only to die here of what is called 'aspiration induced pneumonia.'"

The dogs that aren't killed by machines are killed by the effects of hyperexhaustion as they burn over 12,000 calories a day, for 9 straight days or longer. Their bodies are later tossed into the dump.

“That first race (1973), from Anchorage to McGrath, all you could see along the trail was dog blood and dead dogs," McGrath, AK resident Ted Almasy told the Wasilla Frontiersman 1986. "That's when I got into it with them. After each Iditarod, we used to see dead dogs at the dump. You’d see them poor dogs, blood coming out of both ends.'”

This is not how these dogs deserve to live.

Sign below and tell the Governor of Alaska to remove the clause exempting competition sled dogs from its animal cruelty laws.

Sign Here






To the Governor of Alaska,

There is overwhelming support by the people of your state and of the rest of the country, to end the needless deaths carried out every year at the hands of the Iditarod Race. The same animal cruelty protections afforded to the animals in our homes should be extended to the sled dogs of this race. There is simply no excuse not to.

The graceful beauty and power of a husky barreling through snow shouldn't invoke feelings of suffering and torture. But every year since 1973, during Alaska's 1,000-mile Iditarod race in early March, hundreds are forced into a state-sanctioned nightmare.

The Iditarod has long been controversial for its treatment of sled dogs. They're whipped and driven to run more than 100 miles a day in sub-zero temperatures. And while the power to keep those dogs safe lies with the State of Alaska, exemptions are actually in place precluding the dogs from protection under animal cruelty laws.

Hardly an Iditarod has been held in which a dog did not die.

In almost all of the Iditarod races, at least one dog death has occurred. According to the Sled Dog Action Commission, at least 147 dogs have died in the history of the race, with 15 to 19 falling dead from overwork in the very first, 43 years ago. At least 107 dogs were dead after the 1997 race, as reported by the Anchorage Daily News at the time. In 2009, five dogs died, leaving local veterinarians and animal rights workers helpless to do anything but watch.

"Last year, three dogs died. That is near the average for the Iditarod, and the causes of two of the 2008 deaths were quickly obvious," the Alaska Dispatch News reported the gruesome state of the race in 2009. "One dog was struck and killed by a snowmachine. The other had at some point during the race spit up intestinal fluids and then inhaled them. It was dropped at a checkpoint along the trail and flown back to Anchorage only to die here of what is called 'aspiration induced pneumonia.'"

The dogs that aren't killed by machines are killed by the effects of hyperexhaustion as they burn over 12,000 calories a day, for 9 straight days or longer. Their bodies are later tossed into the dump.

“That first race (1973), from Anchorage to McGrath, all you could see along the trail was dog blood and dead dogs," McGrath, AK resident Ted Almasy told the Wasilla Frontiersman 1986. "That’s when I got into it with them. After each Iditarod, we used to see dead dogs at the dump. You’d see them poor dogs, blood coming out of both ends.'”

Governor, this is not how these dogs deserve to live, and I demand that the State of Alaska remove the clause exempting competition sled dogs from its animal cruelty laws.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Sep 20, 2017 Rita Wolff
Sep 19, 2017 Susan Walsh
Sep 18, 2017 Vikki Hallen
Sep 18, 2017 Mary Garcia
Sep 18, 2017 Connie Haubold
Sep 18, 2017 robert dowling
Sep 18, 2017 jules JAIN
Sep 18, 2017 Cecilia Ojeda
Sep 17, 2017 Meghan Croyts
Sep 17, 2017 Erika Puumala
Sep 17, 2017 BEATRIZ KAJT
Sep 17, 2017 Katriina Hautala
Sep 17, 2017 Hariana Días
Sep 17, 2017 Miia Watka
Sep 17, 2017 Geralyn & Michael Frishman
Sep 17, 2017 HANNA KÜHNE
Sep 17, 2017 David Parker End the cruel, depraved abuse and exploitation of loyal and loving dogs.
Sep 16, 2017 E S Hansen Do the RIGHT thing which is in the BEST interest of these beautiful animals who give more than 100% and should not be treated cruelly and without feeling. STOP exempting sled dogs from animal cruelty laws and PROHIBIT their completely unnecessary deaths!
Sep 16, 2017 Josefapiedad Colom
Sep 16, 2017 Nina Carey
Sep 16, 2017 clay baumung
Sep 16, 2017 Heidi Maria Hakkarainen Be good to Animals!!!!!
Sep 16, 2017 Vesa Virtanen
Sep 16, 2017 Seija Eeva
Sep 16, 2017 kathleen michael
Sep 16, 2017 Jean Clelland-Morin MISERY ! ! ! Exploitation of Non-Humans is IMMORAL ! ! !
Sep 16, 2017 Karen Naylor Stop it now or you are not the civilised country I once thought.
Sep 16, 2017 Laura Cleveland
Sep 16, 2017 Yuet Ngor Rappard Stop this animal cruelty once and for all! They are like any other animal sentient creatures and do not deserve this kind of barbaric treatment!! How would you feel if you were forced into such an immense cruel race??
Sep 16, 2017 Christina Klein
Sep 15, 2017 Liliana Dulgheroiu
Sep 15, 2017 Angelika Peter
Sep 15, 2017 Kathy Siracuse
Sep 15, 2017 zuzana Vargova
Sep 15, 2017 Maija Suomalainen
Sep 15, 2017 ute Davies
Sep 15, 2017 Patricia E Anderson
Sep 15, 2017 gehane h
Sep 15, 2017 sherry butcher
Sep 15, 2017 Henna Singh
Sep 15, 2017 Lisa Schager
Sep 15, 2017 Katja Sibakov
Sep 15, 2017 Hubert Eichkorn
Sep 15, 2017 Katrin Sommerkorn Wir müssen uns für den Schutz der Tiere stark machen! Hunde gehören nicht an die Leine, schon gar nicht bei eisiger Kälte!
Sep 15, 2017 Gaby Maul
Sep 15, 2017 Lucia Opet Animals Should Live Happy Healthy And Free Lives They Don't Deserve To Be Abused Or Killed!!!
Sep 15, 2017 Gabriela Gurdziel
Sep 15, 2017 Fabian Frankenberger
Sep 15, 2017 Marion Brannaschj Ich verachte jede Form der Tierquälerei!!! Es "ist nicht nur ein Tier". Es ist eine Seele die fühlt, ein Herz das schlägt das schlägt und ein Leben das leben will!!!! Sofort mit dieser Tierquälerei aufhören!!!!!
Sep 14, 2017 Anne Pekkala Stop this

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