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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 8,782
Sponsored by: The Animal Rescue Site

It's a sad fact that for many horse trainers, torturous practices like soring are part of the job.

Horse soring involves whipping, burning, shocking, or otherwise irritating a horse's forelegs to get the animal to step higher when presenting in shows and auctions. Other horse trainers shove weights or shims between the hoof and the shoe. Some do both, while wrapping heavy chains around their horse's caustic chemical coated legs.

The barbaric practice has been condemned by government agencies as well as animal activists alike. And while the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been historically responsible for overseeing horse training operations at a federal level, and fining those found guilty of horse soring under the Horse Protection Act, recent decrees from the Trump Administration have severely restricted the Act's efficacy.

A strengthened Horse Protection Act was scheduled to be put into the Federal Register in January 2016, but a White House order on President Donald Trump's first day in office brought it and many other regulations back for review.

Through interviews with convicted horse abuser Barney Davis, the Humane Society has helped to expose the horrific popularity of soring among horse trainers. "Every trainer sores horses," said Davis, who pled guilty to violating the Horse Protection Act on several counts in 2016. "You have to, to get them to walk...you're not going to win if you don't sore [horses]." Davis not only recounted the gruesome truth about soring — bloody forelegs and horses wailing in pain — he also indicated that judges and inspectors at many horse exhibitions are paid to look the other way.

There is no excuse for horse soring to continue in the United States. The federal government and law enforcement has the authority to end this practice and protect our horses.

Sign below and tell the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service that the Horse Protection Act needs to be strengthened and enforced.

Sign Here






Dear USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,

The people of the United States have spoken, and will not stand idly by while horses across the country are tortured through barbaric soring practices.

Horse soring involves whipping, burning, shocking, or otherwise irritating a horse's forelegs to get the animal to step higher when presenting in shows and auctions. Other horse trainers shove weights or shims between the hoof and the shoe. Some do both, while wrapping heavy chains around their horse's caustic chemical coated legs.

With the change in presidential administrations, the Horse Protection Act has lost a lot of its efficacy, and the USDA is no longer able to enforce safety in horse training.

There is no excuse for horse soring to continue in the United States. The federal government and law enforcement still has the authority to end this practice and protect our horses.

I implore you to finally make horse soring illegal by publishing the rules against its use in the Federal Register.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


May 27, 2017 Sigrid Carter
May 27, 2017 Kristine Asay
May 27, 2017 Lyne Forget
May 27, 2017 John Chambers
May 27, 2017 Tiffany Blenis
May 27, 2017 Samantha Manso
May 26, 2017 Bożena Staniszewska
May 26, 2017 Brenda Jones-Sanusi
May 26, 2017 Karen Moore
May 26, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 25, 2017 Leslie Ellis This was made illegal until the current president reversed the laws making horse torture legal again! These regs should be enforced again. This is awful animal abuse! END IT NOW!
May 24, 2017 Nicholas Lee Animal abuse should be treated seriously. Only people without compassion would do this thing to another being. Every countries/businesses in this world really need to start taking animal welfare seriously.
May 24, 2017 Melissa Shinneman
May 24, 2017 Dena Weirich
May 24, 2017 Sophie Miranda
May 23, 2017 Diane Sposili
May 23, 2017 Marta Sherbring
May 23, 2017 Margherita Pinto
May 23, 2017 Barbara Dincau
May 23, 2017 Hilde Saeys
May 23, 2017 Monica Daniel-Marshall
May 23, 2017 Nancy Dictus
May 23, 2017 Mallerie Beausoleil
May 23, 2017 Josie Perez
May 22, 2017 Ginger Geronimo
May 22, 2017 Marilyn Logan
May 21, 2017 Krystyna Zdanowicz
May 21, 2017 Eveline Comte
May 21, 2017 Tina Quinones
May 21, 2017 Heinz-Helmut Umbreit
May 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 20, 2017 Colleen Olson
May 20, 2017 Kathleen Conroy
May 20, 2017 Tiffany Ackert
May 19, 2017 Damon Lucibello
May 19, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 18, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 18, 2017 Lisa Gomez
May 18, 2017 angie moredock
May 18, 2017 Helene Szczepaniak
May 18, 2017 Cher Hester
May 18, 2017 Nancy Bolt
May 18, 2017 Rachel Bona
May 17, 2017 jane cook
May 17, 2017 natalie hughes
May 17, 2017 Cheryl Kacskos
May 17, 2017 Melanie Cannon
May 17, 2017 Arnaud Henseval
May 17, 2017 Lesley Thomas
May 17, 2017 (Name not displayed)

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