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Friends of Strays, Inc....Helping Pets and Their People

Friends of Strays, Inc., (FOS) located in Princeton, Illinois, U.S. is a no-kill shelter in its eighteenth year, involved in rescue, rehabilitation and rehoming of stray, neglected and abused pets. FOS is completely privately-funded. For pets not adopted, the shelter provides a lifetime home and care in spacious, cageless rooms specifically designed for the pets’ needs. FOS takes any animal if space is available, without caveat of breed, medical condition or adoptability, and is one of the few shelters that accepts both FeLV and FIV positive cats/kittens, as well as orphaned kitten/puppy “bottle-babies.” Typically, FOS houses, and volunteers care for approximately 400 cat/kittens and 40 to 60 dogs/puppies on a daily basis. All pets are spayed/neutered, vaccinated, cleared of internal/external parasites, and microchipped. Dogs/puppies are cleared/treated with heartworm preventative.

Four months ago, FOS began offering the community much-needed cat/kitten low/no-cost spay/neuter surgeries at the shelter. Only days after announcing the service, all of the available appointments were filled, and pet parents were booking for the next date. Immediately, three things were apparent: FOS needed to offer more appointments, FOS also needed to offer the same service for dogs/puppies, and two larger recovery rooms were needed – one for cats/kittens and one for dogs/puppies.

Adjacent to the main shelter, FOS has a building constructed in 2008. With a heating/cooling system, a portion of the building could become the spay/neuter clinic, one that would provide safe and comfortable areas for surgeries/recovery for both dogs/puppies and cats/kittens.

The Projects for Paws grant would be used to purchase a heating/cooling unit for the building. FOS could offer more spay/neuter appointments to the community, and provide those pets with the health and behavior benefits of spay/neuter as well as lessening the number of unwanted litters, and expand its ability to serve pets and their people.

Donna Blomquist
Hennepin, IL

Kitten Foster Program Creates Shelter Space for Other Animals

Burbank Animal Shelter

Burbank, CA

USA

In response to the overwhelming kitten population in the City of Burbank, the Volunteers of Burbank Animal Shelter (VBAS) created the Kitten Foster Program (KFP). This volunteer-based program, takes in kittens that arrive at the shelter either injured, ill, or too young to survive without around the clock care. With over 50 foster volunteers, KFP takes in hundreds of kittens yearly.

The KPF volunteer management team offers regular training seminars, ensuring that volunteers are able to handle any kitten situation that may arise. KFP also provides foster volunteers with the support needed to financially care for the kittens. Foster volunteers are supplied with Kitten Milk Replacement (KMR) formula, food, bottles, medicine, grooming supplies, litter, and toys. A goal for the KFP is to begin testing every kitten for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV).

Equipped with all the essentials, volunteers bottle feed newborn kittens, monitor their health, socialize them and take kittens to routine medical appointments at the shelter. Through KFP, the shelter spays or neuters all kittens. Once they reach two pounds and are spayed or neutered, the kittens are adoptable.

KFP organizes bimonthly kitten adoption fairs at the Burbank Animal Shelter. Foster volunteers have a unique opportunity to meet and interview potential adopters at these successful fairs.

KFP fostered more than 250 kittens in 2011, at a cost of $45 per kitten. With a 100% adoption rate, KFP is a model for other shelter kitten foster programs. The Kitten Foster Program helps create space for other animals coming into the shelter in need of forever homes.

Karen Wilcox
Burbank, CA

'Furever' Home for German Shepherd Rescue of Orange County

German Shepherd Rescue of Orange (GSROC) focuses on the rescuing and rehoming of German Shepherd Dogs. We are an all-volunteer rescue, based in Newport Beach, CA, USA, which does not receive any government funding and depends solely on funding through private donations. As with many other rescue organizations, funding is the biggest challenge that we encounter as we try to help as many dogs as possible.

GSROC has always had a goal and dream of owning a facility of our own. Our dogs are currently housed in private boarding facilities and volunteer foster homes. As one can imagine, with having over 90 dogs in our care, boarding costs are a large portion of our operating expenses.

Recently, GSROC has acquired a piece of property which will require a lot of work to get it to point where we can use it to house some of our dogs. Some of the work that has been required was electrical work, fixing and installing fences in the kennels and pouring concrete for pony walls. The work on this property has started and stopped several times due to the availability funds. The end goal is to have facility that can house some of our older dogs who have been more difficult to place, those who are in the process of being rehabilitated, who are disabled, or those that are too sick to be adopted yet. By having a place of our own, the funds that are currently used for boarding can be used to help even more German Shepherd Dogs in the future and give them a chance at a better life.

If we were to receive the Project for Paws grant, it would allow us to finish the construction projects and open for residence in early Fall 2012.

MaryBeth Oginski
Encino, CA

Building for JOY

El Faro de los Animales, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that has been operating for eleven years a limited intake Sanctuary for abandoned dogs and cats in Humacao, Puerto Rico, and today provides shelter to a daily average of 110 dogs and 63 cats. In addition to sheltering and caring for our abandoned animals, we strive to help reduce the overpopulation of animals, by educating the community about the benefits of spaying/neutering and teaching them the necessity of assuming a role of humane leadership, and of our social responsibility toward the wellbeing and protection of all living creatures.

Climate conditions like humidity and heat, and inadequate separation of rooms make proper treatment and sterile conditions difficult. We realized that we must find a way to build a new facility where we can adequately provide care to our sick and injured animals, as well as provide support and assistance to the surrounding communities. We are energized and motivated by our extraordinary residents, who have endured so much pain and sorrow, yet bring us so much joy. Our photo is of JOY, one of our former residents who exemplifies the courage, spirit and uniqueness of our animals.

Our building is under construction and will house an isolation room, quarantine room, and infirmary, providing proper areas of segregation and care for our sick and injured animals. It will also provide an educational room and a boarding area to help us meet our expenses for caring of our animals. The Project for Paws $3,000 grant would help us reach our goal, as we still need to install windows, doors, flooring and other items. In an island with an estimated 150,000 stray dogs and cats, with no concrete governmental plan to address this situation, other than mass euthanasia, our project is urgently needed.

Monica S. Yoma-Awin
Humacao, PR

Beat the Heat - combating pet overpopulation Beat the Heat - c

Friends to the Forlorn Pitbull Rescue Inc, of Dallas, Georgia, U.S.A., strives to promote responsible Pit Bull ownership, provide breed education, combat pet overpopulation, fight unfair legislation, and find qualified homes for sound Pit Bull dogs in Georgia and around the country.

Imagine a community with less strays and ultimately less animals euthanized at the shelter. Paulding County Animal Control alone euthanizes over 2,000 animals per year. On June 9th, 2012, an event labeled ‘Beat the Heat’ took place in an effort to curb the number of animals entering animal control. The rescue teamed with several groups to offer free vaccinations, free flea and tick medications, free de-wormer, free food, and free spay and neuter to Paulding County residents. The results were astonishing. Over six hundred animals received over twelve-hundred vaccines and over four hundred and fifty animals signed up for spay and neuter.

Spay and neuter is the most important factor in fighting the pet overpopulation problem and Friends to the Forlorn is entirely responsible for this portion of the event. The rescue has negotiated significantly discounted rates for services at specific animal hospitals. At an average cost of $67.00 per canine and $42.50 per feline, the rescue will require over $26,842.50 to fix 450 animals (about a 70/30 ratio of canines to felines). Paulding County Animal Control contributed $3,000 and approximately $6,000 in donations have been raised toward the effort. Friends to the Forlorn needs monetary assistance to cover the remaining balance.

Friends to the Forlorn hopes to continue hosting ‘Beat the Heat’ events in other Georgia counties as spay and neuter is the single most pro-active method of fighting pet overpopulation.

Jason Flatt
Dallas, GA

Beat the Heat - combating pet overpopulation

Friends to the Forlorn Pitbull Rescue Inc, of Dallas, Georgia, U.S.A., strives to promote responsible Pit Bull ownership, provide breed education, combat pet overpopulation, fight unfair legislation, and find qualified homes for sound Pit Bull dogs in Georgia and around the country.

Imagine a community with less strays and ultimately less animals euthanized at the shelter. Paulding County Animal Control alone euthanizes over 2,000 animals per year. On June 9th, 2012, an event labeled ‘Beat the Heat’ took place in an effort to curb the number of animals entering animal control. The rescue teamed with several groups to offer free vaccinations, free flea and tick medications, free de-wormer, free food, and free spay and neuter to Paulding County residents. The results were astonishing. Over six hundred animals received over twelve-hundred vaccines and over four hundred and fifty animals signed up for spay and neuter.

Spay and neuter is the most important factor in fighting the pet overpopulation problem and Friends to the Forlorn is entirely responsible for this portion of the event. The rescue has negotiated significantly discounted rates for services at specific animal hospitals. At an average cost of $67.00 per canine and $42.50 per feline, the rescue will require over $26,842.50 to fix 450 animals (about a 70/30 ratio of canines to felines). Paulding County Animal Control contributed $3,000, Dogs on Death Row contributed $7,500, and approximately $6,000 in donations have been raised toward the effort. Friends to the Forlorn needs monetary assistance to cover the remaining balance.

Friends to the Forlorn hopes to continue hosting ‘Beat the Heat’ events in other Georgia counties as spay and neuter is the single most pro-active method of fighting pet overpopulation.

Jason Flatt
Dallas, GA

Beat the Heat - combating pet overpopulation

Friends to the Forlorn Pitbull Rescue Inc, of Dallas, Georgia, U.S.A., strives to promote responsible Pit Bull ownership, provide breed education, combat pet overpopulation, fight unfair legislation, and find qualified homes for sound Pit Bull dogs in Georgia and around the country.

Imagine a community with less strays and ultimately less animals euthanized at the shelter. Paulding County Animal Control alone euthanizes over 2,000 animals per year. On June 9th, 2012, an event labeled ‘Beat the Heat’ took place in an effort to curb the number of animals entering animal control. The rescue teamed with several groups to offer free vaccinations, free flea and tick medications, free de-wormer, free food, and free spay and neuter to Paulding County residents. The results were astonishing. Over six hundred animals received over twelve-hundred vaccines and over four hundred and fifty animals signed up for spay and neuter.

Spay and neuter is the most important factor in fighting the pet overpopulation problem and Friends to the Forlorn is entirely responsible for this portion of the event. The rescue has negotiated significantly discounted rates for services at specific animal hospitals. At an average cost of $67.00 per canine and $42.50 per feline, the rescue will require over $26,842.50 to fix 450 animals (about a 70/30 ratio of canines to felines). Paulding County Animal Control contributed $3,000, Dogs on Death Row contributed $7,500, and approximately $6,000 in donations have been raised toward the effort. Friends to the Forlorn needs monetary assistance to cover the remaining balance.

Friends to the Forlorn hopes to continue hosting ‘Beat the Heat’ events in other Georgia counties as spay and neuter is the single most pro-active method of fighting pet overpopulation.

Jason Flatt
Dallas, GA

Come Play With Me!

The Georgia House Rabbit Society has worked extremely hard to build the first permanent shelter facility for rescued domestic House Rabbits in the Southeast. Three years ago, with the help of an investor, many volunteers and supporters, we renovated a foreclosed, virtually uninhabitable house in a mixed commercial community area into what is now known as “The Rabbit Center and Shelter.”

We have met many challenges and are able to care completely for approximately 30-50 rabbits at the shelter. We now have a great need for a multi-use room added to the side of our existing structure that would provide space for several needed functions:

• An exercise area for our foster bunnies. While we have large pens for permanent housing, a play area would give the rabbits a chance to express their full personalities by jumping, digging, bouncing, tunneling and binkying.

• An introduction area for new adopters to meet our available bunnies and facilitate adoptions as well as a safe and comfortable area suited for our matchmaking program where we introduce and bond rabbits.

• Room for education for both children and adult groups. Our Bunny 101 and 201 classes are rapidly outgrowing our space. Besides providing the best of care for our shelter rabbits, we realize how vital it is that people are given the proper education about rabbit care. Many rabbits are abandoned or die because of the misinformation given about their needs. If we can show people what they are truly like, in an atmosphere they thrive in, with proper feeding and stimulation, it sets the stage for a successful and lifelong commitment between rabbits and their owners.

With experienced volunteer labor this approximately 20x20 area could be built with this grant.

We are located at 2280 Shallowford Road, Marietta, Cobb County, GA 30066.

Ronda Churchwell
Marietta, GA

Buster's Fund

The Prattville/Autauga Humane Society in Prattville, Alabama (USA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing animal cruelty and providing a temporary home for abandoned and abused animals. More than 2,600 animals found aid there in 2011 and more are arriving in 2012. Some have short stays, waiting only a few hours or days until their worried owners arrived to take them home. Others were strays and owner surrenders hoping to go to new homes, waiting to meet the right person or family to join. Some animals, even those with outgoing personalities and great dispositions, might face an obstacle or two on the road to adoption. Heartworms, skin disorders, injuries, or other treatable problems might keep an otherwise adoptable dog or cat from finding a new home. That’s where Buster’s Fund comes in.

Buster was a dog who came to the shelter in 2003. Not long after, a family came looking to add a dog to their household. They met Buster, who rapidly convinced them that he was their dog. There was only one problem. Buster had heartworms. Heartworms can be treated, but the treatments are expensive. Workers and volunteers at PAHS raised money to help Buster join his new family and Buster’s Fund was born. Nine years later, Buster’s Fund still covers medical expenses for adoptable dogs and cats needing treatment before they can be adopted.

Rufus is a dog whose life was changed by Buster’s Fund. He came to the shelter badly burned from scalding grease. After treatment and recovery, Rufus has a family. So has Clint, a neglected dog who came to PAHS with a serious skin condition. Buster’s fund was there for Clint, who now plays with the little boys in his new family. PAHS volunteers work to keep it there for the next animal in trouble.

Deborah Boykin
Prattville, AL

The Animals Dream

The Valencia County Animal Shelter (NM74) is located at 1209 Highway 314 in Los Lunas, New Mexico (just south of Albuquerque). The rural area of Los Lunas, New Mexico located in Valencia County has a high number of stray and unwanted animals that end up in this what was once known as one of the highest kill shelters in the state. The shelter needs help with addition/ remodeling expenses and transporting. In June, Valencia County funded a three day spay-neuter event over the weekend. This was a huge success event done in conjunction with another shelter using their mobile surgical van. To purchase a good running transport van, would be a very welcome site to this facility. This would help get more homeless and stray animal’s safety to other rescues and into homes, what we could even make our very own low-cost mobile spay –neuter van. This grant would be a blessing for something like this for this rural area could be so successful. The Valencia area desperately needs help getting to families that would otherwise not have spayed or neutered their pet. Our shelter for some reason seems to always be full to capacity. We started a group called “Transport Facebook Group” This group helps get animals out of this small rural shelter. A large number of our pets that are being saved by this group and being transported to rescue organizations now have a chance to become part of a happier ever after home. And this is from volunteers and transporters using their own vehicles just think if we had our own transport van we could double our efforts, and make their dreams come true.

Patty Mugan
Los Lunas, NM
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